Malibu candidate pulls papers for the 38th

I’m really sorry to do this. It feels like (and might actually be) my eighth post in a row on the reshuffling of the 38th Assembly district race. But it keeps getting weirder.

This morning, the registrar’s website was to show that another candidate, Chris Garcia, entered the race, listing an address in Saugus.

But there’s one little thing…

garcia_fb

As of last night, his Facebook profile listed his current city as Malibu, and the domain registration for the website provided to the county was registered by Garcia last year with a Malibu address.

Apart from that, his resume seems impressive and he has some history with Tony Strickland who may or may not have something to do with this. Time will tell.

 

Dante Acosta files with SoS in newly-crowded 38th race

38th-field

Last Thursday brought us the news that Sharon Runner (R-Palmdale) wasn’t seeking re-election in Senate District 21. On Friday, Scott Wilk (R-Santa Clarita) of Assembly District 38 decided to run for SD21 instead of AD38, leaving Christy Smith of the Newhall School District board (D-Santa Clarita) as the only candidate in the 38th.

Yesterday brought the news that retired cop Tyler Izen (R-Granada Hills) joined the race, and earlier today we learned that Jarrod DeGonia (R-Simi Valley) of Mike Antonovich’s office was running as well.

And it just got a little more interesting. According to the Secretary of State, first-term city council member Dante Acosta (R-Santa Clarita) has filed a Statement of Intention to run in the 38th.

For his part, Acosta says he’s “taking a serious look at this under a very compressed timetable,” and will make a final decision in the morning after talking with his family. Nominations must be filed by 5pm tomorrow.

Acosta was elected to the council in 2014, coming in 3rd place the top-3 election with 12% of the vote (appearing on 31% of ballots). He currently works as a District Representative for Steve Knight. He previously ran against Buck McKeon in the 2012 congressional primary and briefly considered running in the special election for SD21 last year.

If the field holds (there’s still a few hours for others to file, and each of these three new candidates still need to file their nomination papers), this puts a Republican challenger in each area of the district — Simi Valley, SFV, and SCV. Christy Smith is the only Democrat in the race for the seat, which should be competitive in November with a smallish GOP advantage and higher-than-normal expected turnout among Democrats.

Antonovich deputy DeGonia joins Assembly fray

jar

With tomorrow’s filing deadline for the suddenly-vacant 38th Assembly seat fast approaching, multiple sources report that Jarrod DeGonia (R), a resident of Simi Valley and a San Fernando field deputy for outgoing LA County Supervisor Mike Antonovich, will be a candidate for the seat.

DeGonia joins Christy Smith (D-Santa Clarita) and Tyler Izen (R-Granada Hills) for the race to replace Scott Wilk, who is running in the 21st Senate district.

DeGonia’s entrance doesn’t necessarily rule out any other last-minute candidates, so stay tuned. The deadline for completed nomination papers is tomorrow at 5pm.

 

Retired cop from Granada Hills jumps in the 38th

Tyler Izen (R), a name I never heard of until five minutes ago, is a retired cop and a former president of the LAPD Officer’s Union who lives in Granada Hills. This morning he announced that he is running as for the 38th Assembly District. Here’s the text of his press release.

TYLER IZEN, RESERVE POLICE OFFICER AND
RETIRED LAPD OFFICERS UNION PRESIDENT TO RUN FOR ASSEMBLY.

Granada Hills — On Monday, March 14, 2016, Tyler Izen (R) will file his declaration of candidacy for the 38th Assembly District.

Tyler Izen retired from the Los Angeles Police Department after 30 years of distinguished service. During his LAPD career, Tyler was President of the Los Angeles Police Protective League (“LAPPL”), the union that represented 10,000 sworn members of the Los Angeles Police Department. Izen joined the Los Angeles Police Department on February 4, 1985. He worked patrol, vice investigations, detective, administrative and supervisory assignments as a police officer, Sergeant, and Detective.

Throughout his career, Izen has received numerous commendations and letters of appreciation from judges and supervisors, pointing out the exemplary and noteworthy performance of his duties.

“I will use my 30 years of experience as a police officer to ensure that the legislature passes laws that are smart on crime and do not jeopardize the safety of our families, homes, and property,” stated Izen.

The 38th Assembly District includes Castaic, Santa Clarita, Agua Dulce, Simi Valley, and Los Angeles communities of Porter Ranch, Chatsworth, Northridge and Granada Hills.

Wilk to run for State Senate

Scott Wilk, the two-term Republican Assemblyman of the 38th district, will be a candidate for the 21st State Senate district. This follows yesterday’s news that incumbent Senator Sharron Runner will not seek reelection, and it opens the question of who may join Newhall School District board member Christy Smith in the race for Wilk’s current Assembly seat.

I spoke to Wilk briefly this evening, and he described the decision as an emotional one, as the seat would give him an opportunity to also represent the Antelope Valley, where he grew up.

Today was the filing deadline for candidates in the June primary election, but Runner’s retirement and Wilk’s decision to not run for Assembly automatically extends the nomination deadline for those seats until Wednesday. At present, Smith (D) is the only candidate for AD-38, while Wilk joins the current field of SD-21 candidates: Johnathon Ervin (D), Steve Hill (D), and Star Moffatt (R).

This probably means Tony Strickland won’t be entering the race, but it remains to be seen whether others will join the fray. And the picture for the 38th looks murky, with no clear Republican candidate to take Wilk’s place.

Breaking: Runner will not seek Senate re-election, Sacramento looks to Strickland

cd21-shakeup

According to several high-placed sources within the California Republican Party, State Senator Sharron Runner of the 21st district will not be seeking re-election this year, citing health concerns. GOP Senate leadership is reportedly urging former Senator and Congressional candidate Tony Strickland to run.

According to the LA County Registrar, current candidates for the 21st are Democrats Johnathon Ervin and Steve Hill, and Republican Star Moffatt, who previously ran as a Democrat for this seat against Steve Knight. The filing deadline for the seat is tomorrow, and Runner is presently listed as a nominee. If Runner withdraws her nomination by tomorrow, the nomination period will be automatically extended to Wednesday, March 16.

The 21st District includes the Antelope and Victor Valleys, and much of the Santa Clarita Valley. The Antelope Valley has a clear plurality of the district’s population.

Elected last year to complete now-Congressman Steve Knight’s remaining term, this is Runner’s second partial term in the Senate, having previously been elected to fill her husband’s unexpired term in 2011 after George Runner was elected to the State Board of Equalization. Because she hasn’t served a single complete term, the current term limits law would allow her to serve a full three terms in the Senate after the current term.

Strickland doesn’t currently live in the district, and if he were to run, he’d be entering a large district that only slightly overlaps his previous Senate seat that included some of the eastern Santa Clarita Valley. It’s still unclear whether another Republican nominee will emerge by next Wednesday.

Although it’s widely considered a Republican seat, especially with an incumbent, Democrats now have a slight (+1.4%) registration advantage. No matter the leading Republican nominee, this seat is now much more competitive.

I’ve reached out to Senator Runner’s campaign and Tony Strickland for comment, but neither could be reached. I’ll update as I hear more.

Update: Runner announces she won’t seek re-election (Sacramento Bee)

Plan for Art, Park for Harte, Cushions for Dorothy

Tonight’s Santa Clarita City Council meeting was short and, for the most part, efficient. The mobile home park saga escalated–an emergency ordinance to protect senior housing was extended and plans were made to write a letter (gasp!) to elected officials about difficulties faced by mobile home park renters. Santa Clarita’s rather underwhelming arts master plan was accepted and an inexplicable amount of praise lavished on the plan’s consultants. The meeting ended with the naming of a small park in honor of the late Duane Harte. Now, to recapping.

Opening Matters

[Note: The video feed of this meeting didn’t go live until some Boy Scouts were in the middle of leading the pledge, so I missed Weste’s invocation and any other noteworthy events from the first five minutes. My regrets.]

Public participation begain with Elaine Ballace. She asked if anyone has seen her scarf (it’s been missing for weeks), told us it was her birthday tomorrow (“Yeah Pisces!” she cheered), and said it’s time to get some bigger power players involved in the mobile home rent issue. Ballace said she has tried to get others involved but to no avail. “I just got the runaround. So I plead to you, maybe you have more pull with the State and getting something done. I realize my celebrity status means nothing to them,” she said, with a short but scornful laugh.

A man representing Santa Clarita’s tennis community asked for more tennis courts to be built.

Steve Petzold make the rookie mistake of handing in a written comment card instead of a speaker card, but Mayor Bob Kellar still allowed him to speak. At the microphone, Petzold explained that he had been reflecting on the Laemmle meeting and found himself “dissatisfied” with the discussion that had transpired. He thought discussion of the specific elements of the subsidy would have been more valuable than merely debating the pros and cons of a new theater. His quick accounting of property value changes and City losses in the area was not the clearest, but it seems this isn’t the last we will hear about the Laemmle subsidy. Petzold closed by requesting an open discussion/study of the California Voting Rights Act and district-based voting in Santa Clarita.

City Manager Ken Striplin mechanically addressed the speakers. He said that tennis courts will be considered for the final phase of Central Park and he restated the City’s long history of work on mobile home park policy. Petzold’s recommended review of district-based voting was not pursued further.

Councilmember updates primarily consisted of listing local event after local event–the celebrity waiter dinner was mentioned no fewer than three times. Councilmember Weste went a more substantive route when she announced that the supplemental EIR for chloride treatment will be discussed at the end of the month. She didn’t mention anything about the lawsuit that Allan Cameron was gloating about last month (the suit that supposedly changed the chloride issue at a fundamental level).

Slow Down, Dorothy

The consent calendar had only two non-routine items. The first offered the council’s support for a state assembly bill to benefit the developmentally disabled. The second proposed adding speed cushions and stop signs to Dorothy Way, which has attracted speeding drivers seeking a cut-through to Golden Valley Road. A couple of residents said that something needed to be done to slow dangerous traffic in their community, so they supported these measures. Councilmember Marsha McLean made a point of telling the audience that the community’s developers had been required to set aside funds for traffic calming, so the measures were being paid for by them, not taxpayers. This and the other items on the consent calendar were approved as written.

Write a Letter

The council voted to extend an emergency ordinance protecting senior housing for another ten months. The ordinance was passed because some mobile home parks were attempting to change from seniors-only housing to family housing, which is more lucrative. The problem is that seniors on fixed incomes might lose their homes because of associated surges in rent. A number of speakers asked the council to continue doing what it could to help renters. Specific complaints were made, but they often came from parks where the city can do little else to interfere/intervene. City Attorney Joe Montes and City Manager Ken Stripling both spent some time explaining the limits of the city’s ability to act–for example, long-term leases are exempt from some city codes.

Once again, Councilmember Laurene Weste was the staunchest advocate for renters. She said, “I just can’t buy into the fact that these people are being gouged this way, and I think it’s time that we send a letter articulating some of the grievances that we’re seeing. Nevermind the State Ombudsman, let’s just send a letter to all the elected officials in the State of California in the legislature.” Cheers came from the audience. “I recognize that, you know, that it’s a black hole, but when you look at this kind of abuse, they [renters] have two choices: they can pay it or they can lose the little investment they have in a mobile home. That’s all they have, they have nothing else.” Weste asked if anyone supported her suggestion, and Boydston agreed with her “whole-heartedly.” Mayor Kellar gave his support as well, which was enough to get the letter rolling and to get more applause from the small crowd.

Art, Planned

New business began with consideration of a representative for the Southern California Association of Goverments General Assembly. Councilmember Boydston nominated McLean to be representative and Acosta to serve as alternate, and the council unanimously agreed on both nominations without discussion. McLean gave a quite “thank you” after the vote; she’s always been partial to SCAG.

Tonight also marked the presentation of Santa Clarita’s arts master plan for adoption. The City may have an arts commission, but it took the work of consultants to tell Santa Clarita how to art better. Their master plan was presented, a series of platitudes and cliches given the appearance of meaning by being prefaced with titles or organized into lists. For example:

  • “Vision Statement”: The City of Santa Clarita will be recognized as a “city of the arts,” where the lives of residents, artists, and visitors are enriched through artistic and cultural experiences.
  • “Key Findings”
    • #2: The community is generally satisfied with the current arts and cultural offerings.
    • #4: Residents express strong interest in celebrating history and cultural heritage.
    • #7: Arts and culture are seen as an excellent way to promote diversity and inclusion.

Developing a “work plan” is the next stage of the project. Despite the less than compelling master plan, Mayor Kellar and Councilmember Weste went to some effort to recognize the consultants behind the work. Kellar asked Ingrid Hardy, community services superintendent, to “acknowledge the two gentlemen [consultants] here in the front row for their input.” Hardy had already done that at the start of her presentation, but apparently two introductions were warranted. “Excellent, excellent job gentlemen, we thank you very much, very, very much,” gushed Kellar. Weste said, “[The consultants] understood the real heart of Santa Clarita…we are special and unique and you found that!” Kellar closed by saying, “I would request that a letter be prepared for the entire City Council to sign acknowledging our consultants and what we consider to be a very professional job on behalf of our city.” The amount of attention and praise was rather extraordinary.

The only critical suggestion came from Councilmember TimBen Boydston, who otherwise spoke about the plan in glowing terms. He said that he wasn’t fully sold on the idea of the arts being organized thematically by community. According to the plan, Newhall gets “history and cultural heritage,” Valencia is to be the home of art that is “contemporary and abstract,” the art of Saugus should “celebrate youth and families and cultural diversity,” and Canyon Country art falls under a theme to “explore nature and surrounding open spaces and the environment.” Boydston gently criticized this plan (which he said reminded him of themed areas at Disneyland) for perhaps saddling a community with a theme they might not like as much as others. The idea is also just plain ridiculous, but that point was not addressed.

Note: This is my interpretation of what constitutes representative art for the various community themes, intended to highlight the silliness of it all. Not a figure from the master plan or presentation.

 

A Park for Harte

The late Duane Harte, remembered as a commissioner, volunteer, and truly community-minded individual, was honored by renaming River Village Park as “Duane R. Harte Park at River Village.” Mayor Kellar said that there was a lot of support for the plan, and he thought the park was a fitting tribute because it had been just a block away from Harte’s last home. The suggestion was supported.